Robert E. Lee Hallway

robert e leeNorth Marshall School, the first school on the north side of town, opened on September 3, 1887, as a one-teacher school in a two-room frame structure on Summit Street. The school was moved to a small building across the street from the old Summit Church during the 1889-90 term. In the summer of 1890, the first structure erected in Marshall for a free, state-supported school was built -- a one-room house in the 800 block of Summit Street. The school continued to grow until four grades were taught in 1894. In June 1895, the East and North Marshall schools were consolidated, and a three-room schoolhouse was built at the corner of Beauregard and Lee streets near the Texas and Pacific shops. The building was destroyed by fire, however, in February 1900.

The school was then housed in the old Leach residence, located at the corner of Texas and Summit streets, until a new brick building for grades 1-6 opened for classes November 9, 1902, on Calloway Street. The school was known as North Marshall School until 1925, when it was renamed for the Confederate general, Robert E. Lee.

The first remodeling of the original brick building occurred during the 1938-39 school year. A new wing with a cafeteria, auditorium, principal's office and teacher's lounge was ready for use in late 1950. Remodeling of the old auditorium provided two additional classrooms in 1951. The northwest adjoining lot was purchased for use as a playground in 1953. A central library was ready for use in September 1960. The two-story, 14-room section of the present building was constructed adjacent to the cafeteria wing in 1968, and the old building was torn down.

In June 1961, the boundaries of the Lee and Van Zandt Elementary school zones were dissolved and as a result, Lee was known for about three years as Lee-Van Zandt. Van Zandt School was renovated in 1968 for use as administrative offices, and the original part of the building was razed in 1981. The cafeteria addition was later traded to East Texas Baptist University for land in east Marshall, and is now serving as ETBU's Band Hall.

Robert E. Lee Elementary, being the oldest school in Marshall, was the first with several innovations. Among these were the first PTA, organized in 1906; the first school gymnasium; the first drinking fountain for students and the first piano. Beginning with MISD's reorganization in 1981, Robert E. Lee Elementary served students in grades K-4 until the 2016-2017 school year, when the school was closed and consolidated into the new David Crockett Elementary as part of the MISD Legacy 2017 building program.

re leeRobert E. Lee
Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was an American general known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War from 1862 until his surrender in 1865. A son of Revolutionary War officer Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee III, Lee was a top graduate of the United States Military Academy and an exceptional officer and military engineer in the United States Army for 32 years. During this time, he served throughout the United States, distinguished himself during the Mexican–American War, and served as Superintendent of the United States Military Academy.

When Virginia declared its secession from the Union in April 1861, Lee chose to follow his home state, despite his desire for the country to remain intact and an offer of a senior Union command. During the first year of the Civil War, Lee served as a senior military adviser to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Once he took command of the main field army in 1862 he soon emerged as a shrewd tactician and battlefield commander, winning most of his battles, all against far superior Union armies.

Lee's strategic foresight was more questionable, and both of his major offensives into Union territory ended in defeat. His aggressive tactics resulted in high casualties at a time when the Confederacy had a shortage of manpower. Lee surrendered his entire army to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. By this time, Lee had assumed supreme command of the remaining Southern armies; other Confederate forces swiftly capitulated after his surrender. Lee rejected the proposal of a sustained insurgency against the Union and called for reconciliation between the two sides.

In 1865, after the war, Lee was paroled and signed an oath of allegiance, asking to have his citizenship of the United States restored. Lee's application was misplaced; as a result, he did not receive a pardon and his citizenship was not restored.

Lee publicly opposed the construction of public memorials to Confederate rebellion on the grounds that they would prevent the healing of wounds inflicted during the war. In 1865, Lee became president of Washington College (later Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia; in that position, he supported reconciliation between North and South.

Lee died in 1870. In 1975, the U.S. Congress posthumously restored Lee's citizenship effective June 13, 1865.
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